12 Dec 2018
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The Messiah review

Rather than a pantomime or concert, The Other Palace have selected an alternative production for their festive season: Patrick Barlow’s The Messiah, a comedy of ‘Biblical proportions’ featuring an all-star cast. Taking on the ‘play-within-a-play’ format – and rather like a less...

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10 Dec 2018
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The Band review

Few boy bands of the 1990s have had such an impact as Take That. For many teenagers, they were a band who knew how they felt. Today they remain as popular as ever, so creating a(nother) musical with their songs seemed plausible. However, the sad reality is that Tim Firth’s show is badly thought...

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6 Dec 2018
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Nine Night review

It's easy to love Nine Night. Natasha Gordon’s play is at once a riotous celebration of Jamaican-British culture, a warm picture of intergenerational family life and a meaningful ode to death. There’s no attempt at obscurity here, no riddles to unravel; it’s as easy as being welcomed into a...

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6 Dec 2018
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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time review

Simon Stephens’ play based on Mark Haddon’s book of the same name, directed by Marianne Elliot, has returned to the West End at the Piccadilly Theatre. At the centre of it is Christopher Boone, a brilliantly intelligent 15-year-old who has a condition on the autistic spectrum, who discovers a...

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10 Nov 2018
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Moonlight / Night School review

Jamie Lloyd’s Pinter at the Pinter season has been serving up the late playwright’s works in complimentary palettes: grouped by themes of memory, for example, or politics. If there’s a link between Moonlight and Night School, the pair of plays that make up Pinter Four, perhaps it’s the...

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5 Nov 2018
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Landscape/A Kind of Alaska review

Pinter at the Pinter season is in full swing with the third selection of plays, Landscape / A Kind of Alaska / Monologue currently showing at the theatre named after the celebrated playwright. To commemorate the 10th anniversary of Harold Pinter’s death, director Jamie Lloyd has expertly used all...

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23 Oct 2018
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The Wipers Times review

100 years after the end of WWI, Ian Hislop and Nick Newman’s comedy The Wipers Times returns to the West End’s Arts Theatre to cap off its UK tour. This is the muddy, mirthful, based-on-real-life tale of a squad of soldiers stationed in Ypres, Belgium; while bombs fall and German soldiers sing...

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2 Oct 2018
company-ot

Company review

Bobbie’s turning 35 and she’s at that stage in her life where all her friends are married, or about to get married, so she must be getting ready to settle down herself right? Right?! That’s the basic premise of Stephen Sondheim’s musical Company and even though it was written nearly 50...

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24 Sep 2018
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School of Rock the Musical review

If you sit in the Gillian Lynne Theatre and close your eyes for just a moment, you’d be forgiven for thinking it was the real Jack Black on the stage - you know, the one from the film. It may not be Jack Black himself, but Craig Gallivan, who plays the character of Dewey Finn, is every inch as...

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24 Sep 2018
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The Lover / The Collection review

Those intent on attending every play in the Pinter at the Pinter season will relish The Lover/The Collection as a very watchable, relatively light and quick-paced pair of comedies, showcasing the playwright’s playful sense of the absurd. This complementary doublet has plenty to say on sex, game...

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Latest

Rather than a pantomime or concert, The Other Palace have selected an alternative production for their festive ...

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Latest

It was early 2017 when new musical Come From Away opened on Broadway, so it will have been an impatient two-year wait by the time we get to see it on this side of the pond. The West End launch party was a reminder of this sorry fact, whilst also serving to ramp up our […]

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“A THRILLING ALLEGORICAL MICROCOSM” A vulnerable demographic, an accepted culture of violence, an angry mob, a spokesperson, a new school that seeks to tear down what went before; Mark Ravenhill’s new play The Cane is a perfectly arranged and oh so natural analogy. For what exactly, I’ll spare the spoilers (although this tale could be […]

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